MOTHERFUCKIN' SPACE, BITCHEZ!!!
  • smartasshat
sblaufuss:

space-pics:

Elephant’s Trunk Nebula in 3Dhttp://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Whoa

sblaufuss:

space-pics:

Elephant’s Trunk Nebula in 3D
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Whoa

humanoidhistory:

Skylab and Earth, June 22, 1973. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

Skylab and Earth, June 22, 1973. (NASA)

skunkbear:

This is a time lapse built from Hubble Telescope images taken of the star V838 Monocerotis between 2002 and 2006. But it doesn’t show a supernova. Good old V838 didn’t explode. No.
V838 suddenly brightened, and we’re watching that burst of light pass through a relatively stationary cloud of dust, illuminating the cloud as it goes.
The video was originally posted in 2006, and Slate’s Phil Plait has written all about it, but in the mysterious way of the internet, this stellar light eruption has just recently gone viral.
Click through this thumbnail to a beautiful rendering of the event, by Roberto Colombari:

skunkbear:

This is a time lapse built from Hubble Telescope images taken of the star V838 Monocerotis between 2002 and 2006. But it doesn’t show a supernova. Good old V838 didn’t explode. No.

V838 suddenly brightened, and we’re watching that burst of light pass through a relatively stationary cloud of dust, illuminating the cloud as it goes.

The video was originally posted in 2006, and Slate’s Phil Plait has written all about it, but in the mysterious way of the internet, this stellar light eruption has just recently gone viral.

Click through this thumbnail to a beautiful rendering of the event, by Roberto Colombari:

image


Shadow Portrait of NASA Rover Opportunity on Martian Slope






NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity caught its own silhouette in this late-afternoon image taken by the rover’s rear hazard avoidance camera. This camera is mounted low on the rover and has a wide-angle lens.
The image was taken looking eastward shortly before sunset on the 3,609th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity’s work on Mars (March 20, 2014). The rover’s shadow falls across a slope called the McClure-Beverlin Escarpment on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, where Opportunity is investigating rock layers for evidence about ancient environments.  The scene includes a glimpse into the distance across the 14-mile-wide (22-kilometer-wide) crater.
Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech
Shadow Portrait of NASA Rover Opportunity on Martian Slope

NASA’s Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity caught its own silhouette in this late-afternoon image taken by the rover’s rear hazard avoidance camera. This camera is mounted low on the rover and has a wide-angle lens.

The image was taken looking eastward shortly before sunset on the 3,609th Martian day, or sol, of Opportunity’s work on Mars (March 20, 2014). The rover’s shadow falls across a slope called the McClure-Beverlin Escarpment on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, where Opportunity is investigating rock layers for evidence about ancient environments.  The scene includes a glimpse into the distance across the 14-mile-wide (22-kilometer-wide) crater.

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech


NASA’s Super Guppy Makes a Special Delivery






NASA’s Super Guppy, a wide-bodied cargo aircraft, landed at the Redstone Army Airfield near Huntsville, Ala. on March 26 with a special delivery: an innovative composite rocket fuel tank. The tank was manufactured at the Boeing Developmental Center in Tukwila, Wash. The tank will be unloaded from the Super Guppy, which has a hinged nose that opens and allows large cargos like the tank to be easily unloaded. After the tank is removed from the Super Guppy, it will be inspected and prepared for testing at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The composite tank project is part of the Game Changing Development Program and NASA’sSpace Technology Mission Directorate.
Image credit: NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given
› Alternate view #1› Alternate view #2› Flickr: Super Guppy and Cryotank
NASA’s Super Guppy Makes a Special Delivery

NASA’s Super Guppy, a wide-bodied cargo aircraft, landed at the Redstone Army Airfield near Huntsville, Ala. on March 26 with a special delivery: an innovative composite rocket fuel tank. The tank was manufactured at the Boeing Developmental Center in Tukwila, Wash. The tank will be unloaded from the Super Guppy, which has a hinged nose that opens and allows large cargos like the tank to be easily unloaded. After the tank is removed from the Super Guppy, it will be inspected and prepared for testing at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The composite tank project is part of the Game Changing Development Program and NASA’sSpace Technology Mission Directorate.

Image credit: NASA/MSFC/Emmett Given

› Alternate view #1
› Alternate view #2
› Flickr: Super Guppy and Cryotank


Landslide and Barrier Lake Near Oso, Washington






On March 22, 2014, a rainfall-triggered landslide near Oso, Washington sent muddy debris spilling across the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River. The slide left an earthen dam that blocked the river, causing a barrier lake to form. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this image of landslide debris and the barrier lake on March 23, 2014.
> Read more and view annotated image
Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological SurveyCaption: Adam Voiland
Landslide and Barrier Lake Near Oso, Washington

On March 22, 2014, a rainfall-triggered landslide near Oso, Washington sent muddy debris spilling across the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River. The slide left an earthen dam that blocked the river, causing a barrier lake to form. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat 8 satellite acquired this image of landslide debris and the barrier lake on March 23, 2014.

> Read more and view annotated image

Image Credit: NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey
Caption: Adam Voiland


Expedition 39 Crew Launches Aboard the Soyuz TMA-12M Rocket






The Soyuz TMA-12M rocket launches from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on  Wednesday, March 26, 2014 carrying Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos to the International Space Station.
Image Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
Expedition 39 Crew Launches Aboard the Soyuz TMA-12M Rocket

The Soyuz TMA-12M rocket launches from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on  Wednesday, March 26, 2014 carrying Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos to the International Space Station.

Image Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky


Expedition 39 Prepares for Today’s Launch






The gantry arms begin to close around the Soyuz TMA-12M spacecraft to secure the rocket at the launch pad on Sunday, March 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for 5:17 p.m. EDT, March 25 and will send Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos on a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station.
Image Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky
Expedition 39 Prepares for Today’s Launch

The gantry arms begin to close around the Soyuz TMA-12M spacecraft to secure the rocket at the launch pad on Sunday, March 23, 2014, at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for 5:17 p.m. EDT, March 25 and will send Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos on a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station.

Image Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky


Expedition 39 Soyuz Rollout






The sun rises behind the Soyuz launch pad shortly before the Soyuz TMA-12M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Sunday, March, 23, 2014. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for March 26 (5:17 p.m. U.S. EDT on March 25) and will send Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos on a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station.

Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls
Expedition 39 Soyuz Rollout

The sun rises behind the Soyuz launch pad shortly before the Soyuz TMA-12M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, Sunday, March, 23, 2014. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for March 26 (5:17 p.m. U.S. EDT on March 25) and will send Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos on a six-month mission aboard the International Space Station.

Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls